Researchers unveil radical ‘fart sensor’ pill that can monitor the gas inside your body in real-time

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Researchers have developed a revolutionary new device that can monitor the conditions inside the human gut in real-time. The gas-sensing capsule is about the size of a vitamin pill and can be swallowed to detect and measure gases inside the body


Researchers unveil radical ‘fart sensor’ pill that can monitor the gas inside your body in real-time

  • The gas-sensing capsule is about the size of a vitamin pill and can be swallowed 
  • Once ingested, can measure hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen levels in gut
  • Researchers say this could revolutionize treatment of gastrointestinal disorders 

Cheyenne Macdonald For Dailymail.com

Researchers have developed a revolutionary new device that can monitor the conditions inside the human gut in real-time.

The gas-sensing capsule is about the size of a vitamin pill and can be swallowed to detect and measure gases inside the body.

It could be a game-changer for the prevention and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders, the researchers say.

Researchers have developed a revolutionary new device that can monitor the conditions inside the human gut in real-time. The gas-sensing capsule is about the size of a vitamin pill and can be swallowed to detect and measure gases inside the body

Researchers have developed a revolutionary new device that can monitor the conditions inside the human gut in real-time. The gas-sensing capsule is about the size of a vitamin pill and can be swallowed to detect and measure gases inside the body

According to the team, the ingestible gas-sensing capsule can measure hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen levels in the gut.

This information is then sent to a smartphone app.

In recent trials of the technology, the team said it even identified a previously-unknown immune mechanism in which the stomach uses an oxidizer to fight gut invaders.

‘We found that the stomach releases oxidizing chemicals to break down and beat foreign compounds that are staying in the stomach for longer than usual,’ said Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh, a professor at RMIT University.

‘This could represent gastric protection system against foreign bodies. Such an immune mechanism has never been reported before.’

The device could be a game-changer for the prevention and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders, the researchers say

The device could be a game-changer for the prevention and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders, the researchers say

The device could be a game-changer for the prevention and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders, the researchers say

In recent trials of the technology, the team said it even identified a previously-unknown immune mechanism in which the stomach uses an oxidizer to fight gut invaders. It's packed with technology, but the device is only the size of a pill

In recent trials of the technology, the team said it even identified a previously-unknown immune mechanism in which the stomach uses an oxidizer to fight gut invaders. It's packed with technology, but the device is only the size of a pill

In recent trials of the technology, the team said it even identified a previously-unknown immune mechanism in which the stomach uses an oxidizer to fight gut invaders. It’s packed with technology, but the device is only the size of a pill

The system also revealed the possible presence of oxygen in the colon for the first time.

‘Trials showed the presence of high concentrations of oxygen in the colon under an extremely high-fiber diet,’ Kalantar-zadeh said.

‘This contradicts the old belief that the colon is always oxygen free.

‘This new information could help us better understand how debilitating diseases like colon cancer occur.’

The new device could make for a safer, more efficient way of monitoring the activity inside the human gut, according to the team 

‘Previously, we have had to rely on fecal samples or surgery to sample and analyze microbes in the gut,’ Kalantar-zadeh said.

According to the team, the ingestible gas-sensing capsule can measure hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen levels in the gut (illustrated). This information is then sent to a smartphone app

According to the team, the ingestible gas-sensing capsule can measure hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen levels in the gut (illustrated). This information is then sent to a smartphone app

According to the team, the ingestible gas-sensing capsule can measure hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen levels in the gut (illustrated). This information is then sent to a smartphone app

OBESITY FUELS DEPRESSION BY CHANGING GUT BACTERIA 

Obesity makes people more anxious and depressed by changing the bacteria in the gut – our ‘second brain’ –  research suggested in June.

Scientists found a high fat diet alters the type of bacteria that live in the gut and these play a role in mental disorders.

Obese people and those with type 2 diabetes suffer more negative feelings that others, but scientists have not previously been able to work out why this happens.

Researchers at Harvard Medical School discovered that mice fed a high-fat diet showed significantly anxious, depressive and obsessive behaviors than those on regular diets – but treating their gut bacteria with antibiotics improved their moods.

Even without altering their diets, once the mice were given antibiotics to alter the gut bacteria the symptoms completely ceased or were reduced.

This study was one of the latest to show that mental health and obesity affect one another.

These discoveries underscore the ‘gut-brain’ connection, the researchers said.

‘But this meant measuring them when they are not a true reflection of the gut microbiota at that time.

‘Our capsule will offer a non-invasive method to measure microbiome activity.’

The study tracked seven healthy individuals on high-fiber diets, and found that the ingestible devices were able to detect the onset of food fermentation.

This could pave the way for a more effective method of monitoring the gut microbiome.

‘The trials show that the capsules are perfectly safe, with no retention,’ co-inventor Dr Kyle Berean said.

‘Our ingestible sensors offer a potential diagnostic tool for many disorders of the gut from food nutrient malabsorption to colon cancer.

‘It is good news that a less invasive procedure will now be an option for so many people in the future.’ 

 

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